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The Pitfalls of Affiliate Partnerships: Navigating Online Information

Title: Navigating the World of Online Information: Trusted Sources and Affiliate PartnershipsIn today’s digital age, where information is just a few clicks away, it becomes increasingly crucial to determine the reliability of online sources. With the plethora of websites offering reviews, recommendations, and expert opinions, it can be challenging to separate fact from fiction.

This article will explore two main topics the pitfalls of affiliate partnerships and the importance of accurate medical information review. By shedding light on these subjects, we aim to empower readers with the tools to navigate the vast sea of information online.

Affiliate Partnerships and Trustworthy Recommendations

In the ever-expanding world of online commerce, affiliate partnerships have become a popular way for websites to monetize their content. While these partnerships can enhance revenue generation, they also raise concerns regarding biased product reviews and recommendations.

1.1 Subtopic: The Temptation of Affiliate Partnerships

Affiliate partnerships offer website owners the opportunity to earn a commission when visitors make a purchase through their provided links. This incentivizes website owners to promote specific products, potentially compromising the impartiality of their recommendations.

– Proper Disclosure: Websites should clearly disclose their affiliate partnerships to maintain transparency with their audience. – Independent Research: Seek out websites that supplement their affiliate partnerships with unbiased product reviews and user feedback.

Take note of potential biases and address them when making purchasing decisions. 1.2 Subtopic: The Dangers of Plagiarism and Improper Citations

Content theft and improper citation practices plague the online information landscape, further complicating the reliability of recommendations and reviews.

– Unique Perspectives: Look for websites that offer original content and insightful, unique perspectives on products or services. – Citations and References: Ensure that websites properly cite their sources to provide readers with the confidence that the information they are consuming is reputable.

Medical Information Review and Accuracy

When it comes to medical information, accuracy is of paramount importance. With potentially life-altering consequences, it is crucial to evaluate the reliability of the sources providing medical advice.

2.1 Subtopic: The Role of Medical Experts in Reviewing Information

Websites that provide medical information should prioritize the involvement of qualified medical professionals in the review process. – Expert Opinions: Seek out websites that enlist medical experts to review and verify the accuracy of their content.

– Credentials: Look for websites that clearly indicate the qualifications and expertise of their authors and contributors. 2.2 Subtopic: Navigating Scientific Data Sources and Ease of Navigation

Scientific data sources can be complex and challenging to understand for the average reader.

Websites that effectively present this information in an accessible manner are essential for the dissemination of accurate knowledge. – Internal Links: Websites should utilize internal links to connect related information, allowing readers to explore further and access additional insights.

– User-Friendly Interface: Look for websites that prioritize ease of navigation, ensuring that readers can easily find, understand, and utilize scientific data. Conclusion:

By understanding the potential pitfalls of affiliate partnerships and recognizing the importance of accurate medical information review, readers can make informed decisions and navigate the online information landscape with confidence.

The key is to seek out websites that prioritize transparency, independent research, and the involvement of qualified experts. Armed with these insights, readers can trust in their ability to critically evaluate and select reliable sources for the information they seek.

Title: Navigating the World of Online Information: Trusted Sources and Affiliate PartnershipsIn today’s digital age, where information is just a few clicks away, it becomes increasingly crucial to determine the reliability of online sources. With the plethora of websites offering reviews, recommendations, and expert opinions, it can be challenging to separate fact from fiction.

This article will continue exploring two additional main topics the importance of comprehensive bibliographies and reputable sources, as well as the value of standards for accuracy and objectivity in evaluating information. Lastly, we will delve into the expertise of the Indiana Sleep Center in providing reliable information about sleep disorders, shedding light on their role as an authoritative source.

Comprehensive Bibliographies and Reputable Sources

When assessing the reliability of information, the presence of a comprehensive bibliography and references is vital. This section will outline two essential factors to consider: the inclusion of reputable sources and the importance of accurate citations.

3.1 Subtopic: The Power of a Comprehensive Bibliography

A comprehensive bibliography demonstrates a commitment to thorough research and the use of reputable sources. When exploring a topic, it is essential to scrutinize the quality of the resources cited.

– Reputable Sources: Look for websites that cite reputable sources such as academic journals, government reports, and industry publications. – Diversity of Citations: A broad range of citations from various sources indicates a comprehensive exploration of the subject matter.

3.2 Subtopic: Verifying the Credibility of Sources

While a comprehensive bibliography is a valuable starting point, it is equally crucial to evaluate the credibility of the sources mentioned. – Peer-Reviewed Journals: Websites that rely heavily on peer-reviewed journals exhibit a commitment to scientific rigor and increased accuracy.

– Government Reports: Official government reports provide reliable information backed by extensive research and stringent evaluation processes. – Expert Opinions and Practitioners: Sources that incorporate insights and experiences from recognized experts and practitioners in the field add credibility and real-world applicability.

Standards for Accuracy and Objectivity

For information to be reliable, it must adhere to certain standards that ensure accuracy, objectivity, and rigorous evaluation. This section will explore the significance of these standards and their impact on the credibility of online sources.

4.1 Subtopic: Importance of

Standards for Accuracy and Objectivity

Information that meets rigorous standards for accuracy and objectivity allows readers to trust the credibility of the content they consume. – Accuracy: Websites should prioritize fact-checking, verifying claims, and citing reliable data sources.

– Objectivity: A commitment to objectivity involves presenting information in an unbiased and neutral manner, devoid of personal opinions or commercial interests. – Rigorous Evaluation: Websites that subject their content to rigorous evaluation processes instill confidence in their audience by ensuring the accuracy and reliability of the information provided.

4.2 Subtopic: The Expertise of the Indiana Sleep Center in Sleep Disorders

When seeking reliable information on specific medical conditions, it is essential to turn to authoritative sources. The Indiana Sleep Center’s expertise in sleep disorders serves as an example of reliable information available in specialized domains.

– Expert in the Field: As a renowned institution in the study of sleep disorders, the Indiana Sleep Center boasts a team of medical professionals with extensive knowledge and experience in the field. – Comprehensive Information: Websites affiliated with authoritative bodies like the Indiana Sleep Center often offer comprehensive information on sleep disorders, covering symptoms, treatments, and the latest scientific research.

– Trusted Recommendations: The Indiana Sleep Center’s expertise enables them to provide trustworthy recommendations for sleep disorder management, while also highlighting potential risks or contraindications associated with various interventions. Conclusion:

By recognizing the importance of comprehensive bibliographies, reputable sources, and accurate citations, readers can evaluate the reliability of the information they encounter online more effectively.

Additionally, readers can value websites that adhere to rigorous standards for accuracy and objectivity, ensuring the information they receive is trustworthy and unbiased. Lastly, seeking information from authoritative sources, such as the Indiana Sleep Center, instills confidence in the quality and credibility of the content.

Embracing these principles empowers readers to navigate the vast sea of online information with informed discernment. Title: Navigating the World of Online Information: Trusted Sources, Sleep Disorders, and Positional Sleep ApneaIn today’s digital age, accessing reliable information about sleep disorders is crucial for those seeking a better understanding of their condition.

One specific type of sleep disorder, known as positional sleep apnea, raises questions about the effects of changes in sleeping position on obstructive sleep apnea. This article will explore the significance of positional sleep apnea, the impact of gravity on breathing difficulty, and the potential benefits of adjusting one’s sleeping position.

By delving into these topics, we aim to provide readers with a comprehensive understanding of positional sleep apnea and its implications.

Positional Sleep Apnea and Changes in Sleeping Position

Positional sleep apnea refers to a specific form of obstructive sleep apnea in which the severity of breathing difficulties varies depending on the sleeping position. The following subtopics will address the mechanisms behind positional sleep apnea and the effects of gravity on breathing difficulties.

5.1 Subtopic: The Role of Sleeping Position in Positional Sleep Apnea

Obstructive sleep apnea occurs when the upper airway collapses during sleep, leading to breathing difficulties. In positional sleep apnea, certain sleeping positions exacerbate the severity of these interruptions, hindering airflow.

– Positional Factors: Positions that can contribute to positional sleep apnea include sleeping on the back (supine position), as well as positions that involve pressure on the face or neck. – Movement of Sleep Structures: Specific sleeping positions may lead to changes in the structures within the mouth and throat, such as the tongue or soft palate, causing further obstructions.

5.2 Subtopic: The Effects of Gravity on Breathing Difficulty

Gravity plays a role in positional sleep apnea by affecting how the upper airway functions during sleep. The force of gravity can impact the severity of breathing difficulties, particularly in certain sleeping positions.

– Upper Airway Collapse: Gravity can influence the collapse of the upper airway, making it more likely to occur in positions where the jaw and tongue are more susceptible to falling back. – Nasal Congestion and Fluid Accumulation: Due to gravity, fluid can accumulate within nasal passages, exacerbating nasal congestion and further compromising breathing during sleep.

Understanding Positional Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Its Implications

This section will explore the definition of positional obstructive sleep apnea, measure its severity using the apnea-hypopnea index, and delve into the potential benefits of modifying one’s sleeping position. 6.1 Subtopic: Positional Obstructive Sleep Apnea and the Apnea-Hypopnea Index

Positional obstructive sleep apnea refers to obstructive sleep apnea that is predominantly or exclusively associated with sleeping in specific positions.

The apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) serves as a measurement tool to determine the severity of sleep apnea. – Defining the Term: Positional obstructive sleep apnea occurs when an individual experiences a significant increase in the number of breathing interruptions when sleeping in specific positions, compared to others.

– Assessing Severity: The AHI provides insight into the frequency of apnea (complete cessation of breathing) and hypopnea (partial airflow reduction) events during sleep, crucial in determining the severity of positional sleep apnea. 6.2 Subtopic: The Potential Benefits of Modifying Sleeping Position

Adjusting sleeping positions can potentially alleviate symptoms and improve oxygen levels in individuals with positional obstructive sleep apnea.

– Symptom Improvement: Active efforts to change sleeping positions, such as avoiding the supine position, can result in a reduction in the severity of breathing interruptions during sleep. – Daytime Sleepiness: Modifying sleeping positions to minimize airway obstruction can enhance overall sleep quality, reducing daytime sleepiness and fatigue.

– Blood Oxygen Levels: By optimizing airflow and minimizing obstructions, altering sleeping positions can potentially improve blood oxygen levels, promoting better overall health. Conclusion:

By understanding the mechanics of positional sleep apnea and the effects of gravity on breathing difficulties, individuals can investigate strategies to alleviate their symptoms.

The concept of positional obstructive sleep apnea, measured by the apnea-hypopnea index, offers a means to quantify the impact of sleeping positions. Furthermore, modifying one’s sleeping position can potentially improve symptoms such as daytime sleepiness while enhancing blood oxygen levels.

Armed with this knowledge, individuals can make informed decisions to manage their positional sleep apnea and improve their quality of life. Title: Navigating the World of Online Information: Trusted Sources, Sleep Disorders, and Positional Sleep ApneaIn today’s digital age, accessing reliable information about sleep disorders is crucial for those seeking a better understanding of their condition.

One specific type of sleep disorder, known as positional sleep apnea, raises questions about the effects of changes in sleeping position on obstructive sleep apnea. This article will explore the significance of positional sleep apnea, the impact of gravity on breathing difficulty, and the potential benefits of adjusting one’s sleeping position.

By delving into these topics, we aim to provide readers with a comprehensive understanding of positional sleep apnea and its implications.

Positional Sleep Apnea and Changes in Sleeping Position

Positional sleep apnea refers to a specific form of obstructive sleep apnea in which the severity of breathing difficulties varies depending on the sleeping position. The following subtopics will address the mechanisms behind positional sleep apnea and the effects of gravity on breathing difficulties.

5.1 Subtopic: The Role of Sleeping Position in Positional Sleep Apnea

Obstructive sleep apnea occurs when the upper airway collapses during sleep, leading to breathing difficulties. In positional sleep apnea, certain sleeping positions exacerbate the severity of these interruptions, hindering airflow.

– Positional Factors: Positions that can contribute to positional sleep apnea include sleeping on the back (supine position), as well as positions that involve pressure on the face or neck. – Movement of Sleep Structures: Specific sleeping positions may lead to changes in the structures within the mouth and throat, such as the tongue or soft palate, causing further obstructions.

5.2 Subtopic: The Effects of Gravity on Breathing Difficulty

Gravity plays a role in positional sleep apnea by affecting how the upper airway functions during sleep. The force of gravity can impact the severity of breathing difficulties, particularly in certain sleeping positions.

– Upper Airway Collapse: Gravity can influence the collapse of the upper airway, making it more likely to occur in positions where the jaw and tongue are more susceptible to falling back. – Nasal Congestion and Fluid Accumulation: Due to gravity, fluid can accumulate within nasal passages, exacerbating nasal congestion and further compromising breathing during sleep.

Understanding Positional Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Its Implications

This section will explore the definition of positional obstructive sleep apnea, measure its severity using the apnea-hypopnea index, and delve into the potential benefits of modifying one’s sleeping position. 6.1 Subtopic: Positional Obstructive Sleep Apnea and the Apnea-Hypopnea Index

Positional obstructive sleep apnea refers to obstructive sleep apnea that is predominantly or exclusively associated with sleeping in specific positions.

The apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) serves as a measurement tool to determine the severity of sleep apnea. – Defining the Term: Positional obstructive sleep apnea occurs when an individual experiences a significant increase in the number of breathing interruptions when sleeping in specific positions, compared to others.

– Assessing Severity: The AHI provides insight into the frequency of apnea (complete cessation of breathing) and hypopnea (partial airflow reduction) events during sleep, crucial in determining the severity of positional sleep apnea. 6.2 Subtopic: The Potential Benefits of Modifying Sleeping Position

Adjusting sleeping positions can potentially alleviate symptoms and improve oxygen levels in individuals with positional obstructive sleep apnea.

– Symptom Improvement: Active efforts to change sleeping positions, such as avoiding the supine position, can result in a reduction in the severity of breathing interruptions during sleep. – Daytime Sleepiness: Modifying sleeping positions to minimize airway obstruction can enhance overall sleep quality, reducing daytime sleepiness and fatigue.

– Blood Oxygen Levels: By optimizing airflow and minimizing obstructions, altering sleeping positions can potentially improve blood oxygen levels, promoting better overall health.

Positional Therapy and Treatment Alternatives

Positional therapy offers a non-invasive treatment option for positional sleep apnea. This section will explore the role of positional therapy, the use of positive airway pressure, and potential alternative treatment options.

7.1 Subtopic: Positional Therapy for Sleep Apnea Treatment

Positional therapy involves utilizing various techniques and devices to encourage individuals to maintain specific sleeping positions that minimize airway obstruction. – Exploring Devices: Specialized positional therapy devices, such as sleep position belts or pillows, can help individuals maintain a lateral sleeping position and reduce apnea events.

– Lifestyle Modifications: Simple lifestyle changes, such as elevating the head of the bed, can assist in minimizing supine sleeping positions and reducing apnea events. 7.2 Subtopic: CPAP Treatment and Potential Alternatives

Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a common treatment option for sleep apnea, including positional sleep apnea.

However, some individuals may seek alternative options due to various concerns. – Heartburn and Air Pressure: Some individuals may experience heartburn or gastric issues related to the use of CPAP machines, prompting them to explore alternative treatments.

– Heart Failure: Individuals with heart failure may need alternative treatments to manage their sleep apnea, as CPAP therapy may not be suitable for their condition. Discussing treatment options with a medical professional is crucial in these cases.

Diagnosis Confirmation and Research Needs

Confirming a diagnosis of positional obstructive sleep apnea requires comprehensive sleep studies. This section will explore the benefits and risks of sleep studies and highlight the importance of ongoing research in positional therapy.

8.1 Subtopic: Diagnosis Confirmation through Sleep Studies

Sleep studies are essential in confirming a diagnosis of positional obstructive sleep apnea, providing valuable insights into the specific characteristics of an individual’s sleep disorder. – Sleep Study Overview: Polysomnography, the most common type of sleep study, involves monitoring various physiological indicators during sleep to assess breathing patterns and disturbances.

– Benefits and Risks: Sleep studies allow for accurate diagnosis and customized treatment plans. However, they may be costly, time-consuming, and require overnight stays in the sleep center.

8.2 Subtopic: Research Needs and Drawbacks of Positional Therapy

Although positional therapy shows promise in managing positional obstructive sleep apnea, ongoing research is necessary to optimize its effectiveness and address its limitations. – Refinement of Techniques: Further research is needed to determine the most effective positional therapy techniques and devices, considering individual variability and preferences.

– Incomplete Symptom Improvement: While positional therapy can significantly reduce positional sleep apnea events, some individuals may experience residual symptoms or continued sleep disturbances. Conclusion:

By understanding positional sleep apnea, the effects of gravity, and the potential benefits of modifying sleeping positions, individuals can explore strategies to alleviate their symptoms.

Positional therapy offers a non-invasive treatment option for positional sleep apnea, while also considering alternatives such as CPAP therapy or lifestyle modifications. Confirming a diagnosis through sleep studies and acknowledging the need for ongoing research in positional therapy are crucial steps toward managing this specific form of sleep apnea and improving overall sleep quality.

Title: Navigating the World of Online Information: Trusted Sources, Sleep Disorders, and Positional Sleep ApneaIn today’s digital age, accessing reliable information about sleep disorders is crucial for those seeking a better understanding of their condition. One specific type of sleep disorder, known as positional sleep apnea, raises questions about the effects of changes in sleeping position on obstructive sleep apnea.

This article will explore the significance of positional sleep apnea, the impact of gravity on breathing difficulty, and the potential benefits and considerations of adjusting one’s sleeping position. By delving into these topics, we aim to provide readers with a comprehensive understanding of positional sleep apnea and its implications.

Positional Sleep Apnea and Changes in Sleeping Position

Positional sleep apnea refers to a specific form of obstructive sleep apnea in which the severity of breathing difficulties varies depending on the sleeping position. The following subtopics will address the mechanisms behind positional sleep apnea and the effects of gravity on breathing difficulties.

5.1 Subtopic: The Role of Sleeping Position in Positional Sleep Apnea

Obstructive sleep apnea occurs when the upper airway collapses during sleep, leading to breathing difficulties. In positional sleep apnea, certain sleeping positions exacerbate the severity of these interruptions, hindering airflow.

– Positional Factors: Positions that can contribute to positional sleep apnea include sleeping on the back (supine position), as well as positions that involve pressure on the face or neck. – Movement of Sleep Structures: Specific sleeping positions may lead to changes in the structures within the mouth and throat, such as the tongue or soft palate, causing further obstructions.

5.2 Subtopic: The Effects of Gravity on Breathing Difficulty

Gravity plays a role in positional sleep apnea by affecting how the upper airway functions during sleep. The force of gravity can impact the severity of breathing difficulties, particularly in certain sleeping positions.

– Upper Airway Collapse: Gravity can influence the collapse of the upper airway, making it more likely to occur in positions where the jaw and tongue are more susceptible to falling back. – Nasal Congestion and Fluid Accumulation: Due to gravity, fluid can accumulate within nasal passages, exacerbating nasal congestion and further compromising breathing during sleep.

Understanding Positional Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Its Implications

This section will explore the definition of positional obstructive sleep apnea, measure its severity using the apnea-hypopnea index, and delve into the potential benefits of modifying one’s sleeping position. 6.1 Subtopic: Positional Obstructive Sleep Apnea and the Apnea-Hypopnea Index

Positional obstructive sleep apnea refers to obstructive sleep apnea that is predominantly or exclusively associated with sleeping in specific positions.

The apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) serves as a measurement tool to determine the severity of sleep apnea. – Defining the Term: Positional obstructive sleep apnea occurs when an individual experiences a significant increase in the number of breathing interruptions when sleeping in specific positions, compared to others.

– Assessing Severity: The AHI provides insight into the frequency of apnea (complete cessation of breathing) and hypopnea (partial airflow reduction) events during sleep, crucial in determining the severity of positional sleep apnea. 6.2 Subtopic: The Potential Benefits of Modifying Sleeping Position

Adjusting sleeping positions can potentially alleviate symptoms and improve oxygen levels in individuals with positional obstructive sleep apnea.

– Symptom Improvement: Active efforts to change sleeping positions, such as avoiding the supine position, can result in a reduction in the severity of breathing interruptions during sleep. – Daytime Sleepiness: Modifying sleeping positions to minimize airway obstruction can enhance overall sleep quality, reducing daytime sleepiness and fatigue.

– Blood Oxygen Levels: By optimizing airflow and minimizing obstructions, altering sleeping positions can potentially improve blood oxygen levels, promoting better overall health.

Positional Therapy and Treatment Alternatives

Positional therapy offers a non-invasive treatment option for positional sleep apnea. This section will explore the role of positional therapy, the use of positive airway pressure, and potential alternative treatment options.

7.1 Subtopic: Discomfort and Challenges in Positional Therapy

While positional therapy can be effective, individuals may experience discomfort and difficulty sleeping when adopting new positions. – Disruption of Sleep Habits: Changing sleeping positions may take time and effort, leading to initial discomfort and disrupted sleep patterns.

– Psychological Adjustment: Adjusting to new sleeping positions can require psychological adaptation, especially if individuals are accustomed to specific sleeping habits. 7.2 Subtopic: Precautions and Considerations in Treatment

When considering treatment options, it is essential to be aware of potential risks and precautions associated with positional therapy.

– Blood Clots Risk: Certain sleeping positions, such as sleeping upright or on one side for extended periods, may increase the risk of blood clots, especially in individuals at high risk. – SIDS Risk in Infants: Positional therapies, such as sleeping on the side or stomach, are not recommended for infants due to the increased risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).

Always follow safe sleep practices for infants.

Sleeping Upright and Side Sleeping Techniques

This section will explore practical tips for sleeping upright and side sleeping positions, including the use of positional sleep devices for positional therapy. 8.1 Subtopic: How to Sleep Upright for Better Breathing

Sleeping upright can help improve breathing and alleviate symptoms of positional obstructive sleep apnea.

Here are some tips for achieving a more upright sleeping position:

– Use Pillows: Prop yourself up with pillows behind your back to maintain a semi-upright position. – Adjustable Beds: Investing in an adjustable bed or using a wedge pillow can provide additional support and elevation.

8.2 Subtopic: Side Sleeping Positions for Comfort and Breathing Improvement

Sleeping on the side is often recommended for individuals with positional sleep apnea to reduce obstructions. Here are some techniques to encourage side sleeping:

– Body Pillow: Hugging a body pillow or placing a pillow between your knees can help you maintain a comfortable side position throughout the night.

– Sleep Positioning Devices: Specialized sleep positioning devices, such as positional sleep belts or pillows, can help individuals maintain a lateral sleeping position and reduce apnea events. Conclusion:

By understanding positional sleep apnea and the effects of gravity, individuals can experiment with adjusting their sleeping positions to potentially alleviate symptoms and improve overall sleep quality.

Positional therapy offers a non-invasive treatment option for positional sleep apnea, but it is important to be aware of potential discomfort, challenges, and precautions associated with this approach. Sleeping upright and embracing side sleeping positions can offer practical solutions, but it is crucial to consider individual comfort and safety.

Always consult with a healthcare professional for personalized advice and guidance on managing positional sleep apnea effectively. Title: Navigating the World of Online Information: Trusted Sources, Sleep Disorders, and Positional Sleep ApneaIn today’s digital age, accessing reliable information about sleep disorders is crucial for those seeking a better understanding of their condition.

One specific type of sleep disorder, known as positional sleep apnea, raises questions about the effects of changes in sleeping position on obstructive sleep apnea. This article will explore the significance of positional sleep apnea, the impact of gravity on breathing difficulty, and the potential benefits and considerations of adjusting one’s sleeping position.

By delving into these topics, we aim to provide readers with a comprehensive understanding of positional sleep apnea and its implications.

Positional Sleep Apnea and Changes in Sleeping Position

Positional sleep apnea refers to a specific form of obstructive sleep apnea in which the severity of breathing difficulties varies depending on the sleeping position. The following subtopics will address the mechanisms behind positional sleep apnea and the effects of gravity on breathing difficulties.

5.1 Subtopic: The Role of Sleeping Position in Positional Sleep Apnea

Obstructive sleep apnea occurs when the upper airway collapses during sleep, leading to breathing difficulties. In positional sleep apnea, certain sleeping positions exacerbate the severity of these interruptions, hindering airflow.

– Positional Factors: Positions that can contribute to positional sleep apnea include sleeping on the back (supine position), as well as positions that involve pressure on the face or neck. – Movement of Sleep Structures: Specific sleeping positions may lead to changes in the structures within the mouth and throat, such as the tongue or soft palate, causing further obstr

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